Master of Arts in International Relations, Global Economy and Strategic Analysis

Course Insights

  • Understand the ways in which International Relations work, particularly in national, state, regional and global security levels. The full comprehension and importance of the interactions prevailing in the international system between states, societies and other actors, in relation to their power factors within the changes that are constantly occurring, (such as regional integration efforts within the European Union or in the context of globalization) . Because of the reference to security, it is equally of great importance to understand and analyze defense-related issues by avoiding provocation of conflicts and wars.
  • Understand the theoretical importance of international relations as a scientific tool as well as configuration and continuous evolution of the international system and the structural changes taking place according to each historical period. Further to this, their validity rules, ethics, democracies and national interests as well. The concepts and practical applications of geopolitics, geographical strategies and the strategy itself as a concept and practice in order to achieve predetermined objectives.
  • Understand and analyze the regional and world economic systems as it evolves daily, at a theoretical and practical level, and as the rules of the market, the converging and diverging of national and common interests require and define.
  • Understand and analyze on a theoretical and practical level, the foreign policy of states and how decisions are taken on the basis of national interests, (within and outside the framework of international and regional organizations), whereby each member constitutes building blocks not only for the international and regional organizations, but collectively the international system itself.
  • Analyze and understand how international and external relations, within and outside the framework of states, the private, international law and terrorism combined with conventional security issues, as well as cyberspace and technology security issues which may be used as tools of power.
  • Understand the structure of the international system, the main players and how changes occur through force, i.e. by military, economic and technological means.
  • Understand and analyze the importance of international laws, theories and sources, as well as the operating methods of the international system, its contribution to world peace issues, democracy, humanitarianism, security and the prevention of wars.
  • Understand the differences between international and national law and how international law contributes through its own evolution in the international system changes and vice versa. That is to say, if and how the validity rules and the various players in the international system can restructure rules of international law.
  • Understand the conceptual importance of regional or even global integration, particularly through the European Union’s procedures as a primary role model and law in this direction. In connection with foreign policy, security of sovereign states, transfer of sovereignty on the grounds of development and remodeling of international relations and the international system.
  • Understand the structure, the function and the institutions of the European Union in connection with the sovereign Member States, as well as in relation to European law, as determined through primary procedures and with relevant national laws and international laws.
  • Understand the role and formation processes of the euro zone and the euro, the shortfalls, the problems and solutions within the framework of the European Union itself, in conjunction with the member states and the functioning of international relations, as defined through the various players, including traditional great powers, including the US, China and Russia.
  • Understand and analyze foreign policies in relation to these security issues, economics, trade and social cohesion within regional and global alliances.

  • Understand and analyze on a theoretical and practical level, the security issues within and outside the European Union, within NATO and the global international system, (as determined by the rate and fierce rules), in line with international conventions and international laws by and large.
  • Understand and analyze the causes and structures of a conflict, the challenge and the deterrence, through national strategies, converging and diverging national interests, in addition to the roles played by major powers and international organizations like the UN, NATO, the European Union and the Arab League, and the like.
  • Understand and analyze the conditions of geopolitics and geostrategies in relation to foreign policies, the economy and security at regional and global levels, both on a theoretical and practical level.
  • Understand and analyze, on a theoretical and practical level, the concept of strategy at various levels, notably at a national level, as well as methods and procedures that exist, or need to be found, to meet the final pre-established target. These are all linked to military, technological and economic issues as well as those of social cohesion. The rules of international and national laws such as sovereignty, as well as those of initiation, acceptance and servitude to the common goal.
  • Understand, assess and analyze conflicts and wars, as key events shape international relations and systems in line with national strategies and achieving national targets. In addition to the balanced and unbalanced forces, with major powers determined by military, economic, technological tools and the like, as well as with rules of national and international laws.
  • Understand, evaluate and analyze the concept of deterrence in connection with national strategies, regional and global alliances within international organizations such as NATO, and to be consistent with the procedures and techniques that are adopted and applied to resolve conflicts and to put an end to wars.
  • Understand and analyze the concepts of cyber security as a new dimension in international relations, strategies, foreign policies and security issues. Thus giving cyberspace issues a need to coexist with those of the sea, land, air and space.
  • Understand and analyze the importance of cyber security and technology of “weapons”, (i.e. malware), in its various forms of cyber wars (economic, military, commercial). Through the emergence of these cyberspace technological tools and weapons, they can be used as a key factor power and as a means of achieving national objectives within a coherent national strategy.
  • Understand and analyze the concept of ‘prevention in a traditional sense’ in relation to cyber security. Consequently emerging as a new form of deterrence, which in turn is absolutely necessary to avoid threats, particularly those arising from modern terrorism.
  • Understand and analyze the various forms of threats as they emerge from international relations and simultaneously evaluate and analyze their preventative measures under specific strategic options, for halting the escalation of tensions and to prevent conflicts and wars, in turn leading to stability and peace.
  • Understand, evaluate and analyze case studies, (on a theoretical and practical level), of major conflicts such as in Palestine, Cyprus and Nagorno- Karabakh. This is done in order to comprehend what the causes are, how escalations and de-escalations happen, how it can be solved and why it has not been settled as of yet.
  • Understand and analyze the issues and the importance of energy resources in relation to the economy, the existing rules, geopolitical, geostrategic, national strategies of states, national interests, major global and regional powers, as well as in relation to the formation of alliances, either to prevent conflicts or to achieve predefined strategic goals.
  • Understand and analyze an energy resource as a major factor in shaping national strategies and power as well as a source of convergence or divergence of interests, and the causes of conflicts and wars or alliances including stability, security and peace.

Module Descriptor 1

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
International Law IRS 601 1st 7.5 188 Dr. Christodoulos George Pelagias

Aims

The aim of the module is to provide a critical appreciation on a broad range of issues relating to the theory, sources and practice of international law. It aims to promote open discussion and debate, critical analysis, research and development of changing boundaries of international law at the time of globalization, conflicts and wars. It aims to stimulate excellent research and writing skills based on stronger foundations in the study of international law. The module promotes a better understanding of the dynamics of the International Legal Studies through law related frameworks, in areas such as international legal theory, customary law, conventions, institutions, international conflicts, self determination, war crimes, human rights and minority rights.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an awareness of international law as a legal system distinct from national legal systems;
  • Demonstrate in depth knowledge of substantive areas of international law studied within the module;
  • Analyse international maritime law and the meaning of exclusive economic zones and shelf continents;
  • Analyse international disputes in terms of applicable legal rules and propose arguable solutions to tangible problems in the light of such analysis;
  • Synthesise relevant primary and secondary sources, bringing together materials from a variety of sources and make critical judgements on the merits of particular arguments and propose a reasoned choice between alternative solutions;
  • Compose written presentations in this field of study which are coherent, rational and logically structured.

Module Descriptor 2

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Globalization and International Economic Affairs Theory IRS 602 1st 7.5 188 Dr. Yiannos Charalambides

Aims

This course surveys the nature of globalization and its multifaceted interactions with national and international cybersecurity, economic and political forces and trends, national security issues and concepts, domestic politics and international affairs. The historical context of globalization is examined, to provide a broader understanding of this movement and to help students gain insights into how it will impact a future global society. Key developments in the US, Europe, Asia and the Middle East will be examined through events such as major wars, decolonization, the fall of empires and the birth of nations. International financial and military crises and terrorism will also be included. The EU will also be examined as a model of regional and global integration. Moreover, we will also study how globalization created enormous opportunities for criminals and resulted in organized crime that diversified and became a global entity.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Be familiar with terms, concepts and important publications related to the evolution of globalization and its impact on national and international cybersecurity
  • Identify the origins of globalisation as an idea and as a phenomenon
  • Grasp the basic political and economic concepts which lie behind markets, firms, international trade and finance as well as national security issues and challenges
  • Critically assess arguments made about the nature, causes and consequences of globalisation
  • Recognise the impact globalisation is having on different levels of society: individuals, firms and industries, nations, states and the world political economy
  • Utilize the tools of economic and political analysis to globalization issues and their challenges to national security
  • Assess how globalisation affects security policy options
  • Understand the effects of the internet on globalization

Module Descriptor 3

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Theory of International Relations & conflict Analysis IRS 603 1st 7.5 188 Dr. Pavlos-Ioannis Koktsidis

Aims

This module introduces students to the principal concepts and theories associated with the academic discipline of International Relations, in particular Realism, Functionalism and Liberalism and their applications in conflict analysis. It equips students with an understanding of major issues and debates in the contemporary world of politics in the areas of peace and security, living space, political economy, stability, balance of power and development. It examines alternative methods of conflict management and resolution, with some focus on international negotiation, and obstacles or challenges to making them effective; the important functions of pre-negotiation, second-track diplomacy and the post-agreement negotiation phase concerned with implementation and compliance.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Analyse theoretical and conceptual approaches from the disciplines of international relations and conflict analysis
  • Examine the structure in the evolution of the international system through relevant theories
  • Understand the theories of international relations in practice in the context of the international system
  • Engage with key issues of contemporary debate in the field of international politics and conflict analysis.
  • Study the structure of conflict management, negotiations and solutions

Module Descriptor 4

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Classical Wars, Cyberwar and Conflict Analysis IRS 604 3rd 7.5 188 Dr. Yiannos Charalambides

Aims

In this course we take a comprehensive look at the subject. We start with an exploration of what cyberspace is, what role it plays in civilian life, economic and commercial affairs and military operations, how information systems upon which cyberspace is built work, what security means in that realm, and what characteristics of such systems (e.g., vulnerabilities) permit others to violate security there. From that foundation, we will continue to discuss technological, tactical, and operational issues, from both the offensive and defensive level. Parallels will be drawn among cyber warfare, conventional warfare and terrorism, making specific comparisons to electronic warfare. Finally, we discuss cyber-war from a strategic perspective, including the concepts of cyber-deterrence and crisis management.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Define war and cyber war and whether the cyber war concept exists independently of traditional conflicts.
  • Cyber security and national strategy.
  • Examine and understand how cyber space and cyber war change the structure of the international system and international relations.
  • Examine why and to what extent cyber space and cyber techniques, methods and weapons constitute national strength.
  • Understand and examine cyber-attacks in the context of global, economic and commercial system.
  • Deal with actual offensive cyber operation techniques.
  • Appreciate the ethical issues surrounding the use of digital techniques to engage in “armed” conflict.
  • Understand what are the new cyber weapons, which are the cyber army, how they act in the international system and the impact they have in economic, commercial and military areas, conflict and wars.
  • Understand how our society should best steer a course forward in setting norms, international guidelines, and expected behavior in the use of digital weapons and cyber conflict.

Module Descriptor 5

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Energy Crossroads in the global and regional system IRS 605 2nd 7.5 188 Dr. Solon Kasinis

Aims

This module will provide students with an understanding of the importance that energy plays in the international system as an instrument of strength, stability, peace, conflict and war. Students will also have the opportunity to understand how essential energy and energy routes are in the context of geopolitical power games and how they affect the shaping of the international system. This module examines how energy routes influence the social, political, economic, environmental areas, the oil prices and geopolitical consequences. It also focuses on whether energy and energy routes are instruments of stability and peace, or of conflicts and wars.

Module Descriptor 6

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
European Union Integration IRS 606 2nd 7.5 188 Dr. Yiannos Charalambides

Aims

This module will provide students with an understanding of the classical and contemporary theories of integration, the European project and the history of integration. It will illustrate the main institutions of the European Union and will present selected contemporary issues related to the politics and government of the European Union and their broader contexts in such matters as security issues, single European market-Euro, democratic deficit, new European, economic and banking mechanism as well as the role of the EU in the regional and global systems.

Learning Outcomes

This module aims to provide an understanding of the politics and government of the European Union. By the end of the module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of European integration since 1945, theories of integration, the main institutions of the European Union, and key issues in European integration.
  • Deploy different theories in order to analyse the historical and contemporary politics and government of the EU and its predecessors.
  • Demonstrate appropriate cognitive, communicative and transferable skills, including understanding core concepts and theories, developing the capacity for independent learning through access to general learning resources, making individual seminar presentations.
  • Examine contemporary economic, security and institutional case studies relevant impertinent to the problems that the EU faces and the solution that should be given or that should be found.

Module Descriptor 7

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Foreign Policy & Strategy IRS 607 2nd 7.5 188 Dr. Pavlos-Ioannis Koktsidis

Aims

This course seeks to shed light on Diplomacy and Foreign Policy which are central to the understanding of international politics and strategy. The structure of the international system induces a constant need for political dialogue and negotiations due to its character balancing between convergent and conflicting national interests. Besides war, diplomacy is the common language states are using to interact on the world stage. The module provides theoretical understanding of foreign policy and diplomacy and applies these theoretical tools to the formulation of strategy in order to meet contemporary diplomatic issues and great power politics.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the aims and processes of foreign policy making.
  • Understand bodies strategy, national aims and means.
  • Examine how we formulate a strategy in order to achieve national goals and interests.
  • Understand the mechanisms in foreign policy and international relations more generally; evaluate reports about foreign policy and official government statements related to foreign policy and international relations.

Module Descriptor 8

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
International Political Economy IRS 608 1st 7.5 188 Dr. Pavlos-Ioannis Koktsidis

Aims

The module looks historically at the way ‘politics’ is put into the term political economy, (from Adam Smith onwards), to question mainstream economic ideology. It evaluates assumptions about the identity of economic agents, the visions in economic thought that gives rise to, and significance for, theory building. These philosophical perspectives are used to critically explore contemporary issues in international political economy such as the nature and logic of capitalism, the rise of neo-liberalism, the new economic thinking, globalisation and the global economic crisis.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Recognise and understand definitions of globalisation from an economic perspective by making distinctions between theories of markets and theories of capitalism.
  • Make distinctions between market theories and theories of communism, capitalism and socialism.
  • Survey national and international economic policies.
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of human nature, methodological individualism, value, idealism, materialism, the role of the state and the place these concepts have for distinguishing between important schools of economic thought.
  • Identify contemporary conflicts between neo-liberal and social democratic ideologies.
  • Vulnerabilities of liberalism and neo-liberalism and solutions.

Module Descriptor 9

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
EU Economics IRS 609 2nd 7.5 188 Dr. Pavlos-Ioannis Koktsidis

Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the economic arguments underpinning the development of the European Union. Students will be exposed to the principles of economic integration, as well as the motivation behind EU regional trade agreements. A variety of major European policy initiatives will also be examined. Although emphasis will be given on economic issues, the political, institutional and historical viewpoints of EU will also be examined.

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand and analyse various key aspects of European economic integration.
  • Understand and analyse various key aspects of European economic integration.
  • Understand and evaluate the effects of EU integration on competition and EU competition policies.
  • Understand and evaluate the effects of EU integration on growth and regional disparities in the EU.
  • Understand and analyse the effects of EU integration on labour markets and migration.

Module Descriptor 10

Module Title Module Number Semester Credits Learning Hours Module Leader
Economic Diplomacy IRS 610 3rd 7.5 188 Dr. Pavlos-Ioannis Koktsidis

Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the concepts of diplomacy, negotiations and decision-making processes within the global economic environment. With the aid of various case studies, students will gain valuable knowledge regarding the context of international economic relations, by being exposed to a variety of methods, means and approaches, used by both state and non-state actors

Learning Outcomes

After the successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the various methods, means, approaches, modes and context of international economic diplomacy.
  • Understand the solid bond between globalisation and economic diplomacy.
  • Understand negotiating strategies and the difference between weak and strong actors.
  • Understand the interaction between local and international politics in economic diplomacy.
  • Understand the significant role played by non-state actors (such as multinational corporations, NGOs etc) in the context of international economic affairs.